Tents beyond tents: Haiti earthquake comic from 2011

In 2011, the Cartoon Movement team spent a month on Haiti to work with Haitian comic artists and journalists to document life in Haiti after the devastating 2010 earthquake. Now, 10 year later, Haiti is again struck by a large earthquake, while the county has yet to recover from the last one. This comic is still sadly relevant:

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Peace and politics in South Sudan

In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we produced a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

This comic, based on research by Dr Naomi Pendle and drawn by South Sudanese comic artist Tom Dai, looks at the peace process and the role of the army in South Sudan between 2005 and 2020.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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It's who you know

In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we are producing a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

This comic, based on research by Dr Patrycja Stys and drawn by Moses Kas, focuses on two women of different social status in a small town in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). How do they access healthcare, justice and education? As one of the women says: It's not about how much you have, it's who you know.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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Preview: It's not about how much you have

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On Wednesday, we will publish the 5th comics journalism story in our series produced with with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). This comic, drawn by Moses Kas, focuses on two women of different social status in a small town in DRC. How do they access healthcare, justice and education? As one of the women says: It's not about how much you have, it's who you know.


Hazard Pay

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In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we are producing a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

2014, Sierra Leone. In the midst of the Ebola crisis sweeping the country, the comic tells the story of a burial team in charge of documenting Ebola cases and processing the bodies. Although a gruesome job, for most this was also their first formal employment that paid well and regularly.  The art is by Didier Kassai, who also made Making ends meet around Virunga.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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A poisoning in Palabek

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In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we are producing a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

There are currently over 2 million South Sudanese refugees, most resulting from the 2013-2018 civil war. Despite now living in relative safety, most residents of Palabek Refugee Settlement in northern Uganda still experience great feelings of insecurity and uncertainty. This story, in which an old woman is accused of witchcraft, shows how people feel abandoned by camp authorities and resort to taking action themselves.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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Making ends meet around Virunga

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This comic was produced for the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). It was supported by the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and the Economic Social and Research Council (ESRC).

The story focuses on Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The park is Africa’s most biodiverse protected area, and the park guards are seen as heroes, creating a safe environment for tourists and protecting the wildlife. However, the people living near the park tell a different story. The family in this comic is fictional, but the story they tell is based on testimonies, gathered in Verweijen, J., Kubuya, S., Mahamba, E., Marijnen, E., Murairi, J., and Mvano, C. (2020) Conflicts around Virunga National Park: Grassroots perspectives. The Hague: Knowledge Platform Security & Rule of Law. The artwork is by Didier Kassi.

This summer we relaunched our website; the new comics journalism section is currently being developed and will be online soon. That's why we are publishing this comic on our blog first. Read the comic below or download the PDF version here. A French version is available here.

This comic is part of a series of six comics on public authority in different countries in Africa. Other installments:

Vigilantes: security or insecurity?

 

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Next week: new comics journalism

SampleFragment from Making ends meet around Virunga.

Next week, on Wednesday November 11, we will publish the second comic in our series of comics journalism about public authority in Africa, made together with the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa. Making end meet around Virunga (artwork by Didier Kassai) tells the story of a family living next to Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The park guards are often hailed as heroes of environmental protection, but this family tells a different story.

The first comic in this series, about vigilante justice in Uganda, can be read here.