Fighting agrocolonialism in the Congo

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Our latest comics journalism project is a cooperation with the University of Sussex and the University of Sheffield.

The comic is based on field research conducted around the Feronia palm oil plantation in Tshopo province in north-east DR Congo as part of a British-Academy funded project on “environmental defenders and atmospheres of violence” (SDP2/100278) hosted by the University of Sussex. The research was carried out by researchers from the Université Catholique du Graben, the University of Sheffield and the Organisation Congolaise des Ecologistes et Amis de la Nature (OCEAN).

The story focuses on people living next to the Feronia concession and how they experience and fight against the company. While the names in the comic are fictional, the described events are based on testimonies we gathered during our field research. This includes accounts of repression and heavy-handed responses by the security services, which highlight the dangers faced by those defending their land, their livelihoods and the environment.

You can download the PDF here.

 

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Tents beyond tents: Haiti earthquake comic from 2011

In 2011, the Cartoon Movement team spent a month on Haiti to work with Haitian comic artists and journalists to document life in Haiti after the devastating 2010 earthquake. Now, 10 year later, Haiti is again struck by a large earthquake, while the county has yet to recover from the last one. This comic is still sadly relevant:

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Peace and politics in South Sudan

In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we produced a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

This comic, based on research by Dr Naomi Pendle and drawn by South Sudanese comic artist Tom Dai, looks at the peace process and the role of the army in South Sudan between 2005 and 2020.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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It's who you know

In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we are producing a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

This comic, based on research by Dr Patrycja Stys and drawn by Moses Kas, focuses on two women of different social status in a small town in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). How do they access healthcare, justice and education? As one of the women says: It's not about how much you have, it's who you know.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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Become a Cartoon Movement supporter!

القمع وو حرية التعبيرCartoon by Ahmad Rahma

In December 2020, we celebrated our 10th anniversary (very modestly, given we were, and still are, in lockdown). We are incredibly proud to have been around for a decade. Building and launching Cartoon Movement would not have been possible without funding, which we were lucky to have in 2010. But our aim was always to become self-sustaining as a platform, and we have been since 2013.

Keeping ourselves afloat without external funding, investors or advertisers has been challenging at times. While our hosting and server costs have only gone up over the years, money earned per cartoon sold has either stayed the same or gone down.

So in 2021, we would like to see if we can leverage additional support from our fans. If you like what we do, and if you want to support political satire, press freedom, and freedom of expression in general, please consider making a (onetime or monthly) donation. You can also become a supporter of our Facebook page. Supporting us will not only ensure we remain ad-free, it will also help us pay our cartoonists for the beautiful, scathing, hilarious and always thought-provoking work they do.

Part of our mission is to promote editorial cartoons and we feel we do that best by trying to reach the widest audience possible. Therefore, we will not put our cartoons behind a paywall. However, we are open to experiment with fan involvement. If you became a support, would you for instance be interested to help in the editorial process? Or would you like access to exclusive content such as interviews and behind-the-scenes to get an idea of the creative process behind the cartoon?

Let us know by leaving a comment or by sending us an email at cartoons@cartoonmovement.com

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Cartoon by Gatis Sluka

 


Preview: It's not about how much you have

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On Wednesday, we will publish the 5th comics journalism story in our series produced with with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). This comic, drawn by Moses Kas, focuses on two women of different social status in a small town in DRC. How do they access healthcare, justice and education? As one of the women says: It's not about how much you have, it's who you know.


Hazard Pay

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In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we are producing a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

2014, Sierra Leone. In the midst of the Ebola crisis sweeping the country, the comic tells the story of a burial team in charge of documenting Ebola cases and processing the bodies. Although a gruesome job, for most this was also their first formal employment that paid well and regularly.  The art is by Didier Kassai, who also made Making ends meet around Virunga.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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A poisoning in Palabek

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In partnership with the Centre of Public Authority and International Development (CPAID) of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), we are producing a series of six comics on public authority in different countries across Africa.

There are currently over 2 million South Sudanese refugees, most resulting from the 2013-2018 civil war. Despite now living in relative safety, most residents of Palabek Refugee Settlement in northern Uganda still experience great feelings of insecurity and uncertainty. This story, in which an old woman is accused of witchcraft, shows how people feel abandoned by camp authorities and resort to taking action themselves.

You can read the full comic below or download the PDF here.

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